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Simply the Best Documentaries

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The White Helmets
Pax Romana
Fascination Coral Reef
Race for Absolute Zero
The Art of Flight
Volcano
How to Grow a Planet Life from Light
Arrival
Is Poverty Genetic
The Power Of The Placebo
Dinosaurs Giants of Patagonia
Legends of Flight
The Mating Game
Boko Haram and Unnatural Selection
The Medici: Makers of Modern Art
Ocean Wonderland 3D
WWII In 3D
Himalaya with Michael Palin: North by Northwest
The End of God
Attenboroughs Paradise Birds
Trapped
Bigger, Stronger, Faster
Triumph
Awake The life of Yogananda
The Great European Disaster Movie
Dangerous Knowledge: God messenger
The Ivory Game
Biggest Things in Space
Dont Grow Old
Is Gravity An illusion
How Did We Get... Here
IMAX Hubble
Quantum Computing
Birth of the British Novel
Galapagos with David Attenborough Origin
Jerusalem

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Cooked: Earth
Cooked: Earth 2016

All cooking is transformation, and in that sense, it's miraculous, it's alchemy. But of all the different transformations we call cooking, fermentation is the most miraculous and the most mysterious. And that's because it doesn't involve any applied heat at all. Discover how microbes help turn raw ingredients into delicacies like chocolate and cheese as Pollan tackles the mysterious process of fermentation.

Category:Culture  Duration:51:17   Series: Cooked

Growing
Growing 1994

The second episode is about how plants gain their sustenance. Sunlight is one of the essential requirements if a seed is to germinate, and Attenborough highlights the cheese plant as an example whose young shoots head for the nearest tree trunk and then climb to the top of the forest canopy, developing its leaves en route. Using sunshine, air, water and a few minerals, the leaves are, in effect, the "factories" that produce food. However, some, such as the begonia, can thrive without much light. To gain moisture, plants typically use their roots to probe underground. Trees pump water up pipes that run inside their trunks, and Attenborough observes that a sycamore can do this at the rate of 450 litres an hour — in total silence. Too much rainfall can clog up a leaf's pores, and many have specially designed 'gutters' to cope with it. However, their biggest threat is from animals, and some require extreme methods of defence, such as spines, camouflage, or poison. Some can move quickly to deter predators: the mimosa can fold its leaves instantly when touched, and the Venus flytrap eats insects by closing its leaves around its prey when triggered. Another carnivorous plant is the trumpet pitcher that snares insects when they fall into its tubular leaves. Attenborough visits Borneo to see the largest pitcher of them all, Nepenthes rajah, whose traps contain up to two litres of water and have been known to kill small rodents.

Category:Nature  Duration:49:00   Series: The Private Life of Plants

 
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