Last Watched

Saturn

   2011    Science
No planet beats Saturn for jaw-dropping beauty. Saturn is the most photogenic planet in all the solar system. Some of the pictures are to die for. But the postcards only tell part of the story. It really is rolling and seething inside. For ringside action, soar above the planet with its six-sided storms. Even more mystery surrounds the impressive Fountains of Enceladus where the secrets of life might spring from the moons salty geysers. And the samples are coming out in space, there's a big sign there: Free Samples: Take One.
Series: A Traveler Guide to the Planets

Neptune and Uranus

   2011    Science
Uranus and Neptune: The 'ice giants'. Strap yourselves in for an incredible voyage to the most remote and intriguing planets of all. There has never been a better time to boldly go where no human has gone before to follow in the footsteps of our robot pioneers and visit the planets of the Solar System. Ever wanted to be an astronaut? Imagine heading into the Ice Zone, the frigid, dark realm beyond the orbit of Saturn. So far from the Sun, you wouldn't expect much to be happening here. From orbit, Uranus appears sedate and calm. But why is the planet on its side? And Neptune: The second blue planet, and the last world in our Solar System. But something is driving its wild winds. And what about its Great Dark Spot? this planet just changes its spots. Leopards don't, but Neptune does.
Series: A Traveler Guide to the Planets

Taking To The Air

   2005    Nature
As the early June sun begins to set over a calm river in Central Hungary, masses of ghostly shapes emerge from their larval cases to take to the air for the first time. They are mayflies and in a spectacular display, thousands of them demonstrate how the very first wings were used. From the stunning aerobatics of hoverflies in an English garden to the mass migration of purple crow butterflies in the valleys of Taiwan, this episode tells the tale of the first animals ever to take to the air. Unique footage reveals the lightning fast reactions of bluebottles and hoverflies, filmed with one of the world's fastest cameras, and Sir David Attenborough handles the world's largest (and perhaps most ferocious) insect - the Titan beetle.
Series: Life in the Undergrowth

Intimate Relations

   2005    Nature
The world of invertebrates exists in a web of relationships with plants and other animals. Unique footage of the world's smallest insect (a fairy wasp only quarter of a millimetre long) shows it flying underwater to find the eggs of water beetles in which to lay its own brood. Some ants 'farm' the trees that give them shelter, creating areas known as 'Devil's gardens'. To make sure these grow without competition, they kill off other seedlings in the surrounding vegetation. The blister beetle's larvae huddle together on the end of a piece of grass and mimic a female bee. When a male bee tries to mate with the 'female', the larvae grab on to his belly. Confused, he flies away and searches for a real female. When he eventually finds her and mates with her, the beetle larvae hurriedly swap from his front on to her back, and hence get carried back to her nest where they eat her pollen supplies.
Series: Life in the Undergrowth

Supersocieties

   2005    Nature
Invertebrates don't always operate alone. True society was the last feature to evolve in invertebrates, as recently as the time of Tyrannosaurus. In the last programme see the tensions below the surface in some of the great social structures built by insects, and witness the carnage when an ant colony and a termite colony wage war.
Series: Life in the Undergrowth
In Search of Beethoven
In Search of Beethoven

   2009    Art
Leaving Neverland
Leaving Neverland

   2019    Culture
Inner Worlds Outer Worlds
Inner Worlds Outer Worlds

   2012    Culture
Planet Earth
Planet Earth

   2007    Nature
The Nazis, A Warning From History
The Nazis, A Warning From History

   1997    History
Black Hole Apocalypse
Black Hole Apocalypse

   2018    Science
Frozen Planet
Frozen Planet

   2011    Nature