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Baraka

       Culture
Without words, Ron Fricke shows us the world, with an emphasis not on 'where,' but on 'what's there.' It begins with morning, natural landscapes and people at prayer: volcanoes, water falls, veldts, and forests; several hundred Balinese Hindu men perform kecak, the monkey chant. Indigenous peoples apply body paint; whole villages dance. The film moves to destruction of nature via logging, blasting, and strip mining. Images of poverty, rapid urban life, and factories give way to war, concentration camps, and mass graves. Ancient ruins come into view, and then a sacred river where pilgrims bathe and funeral pyres burn. Prayer and nature return. A monk rings a huge bell; stars wheel across the sky. (Click CC for places description)
Series: Baraka.eng.srt

The Last Empire

   2016    History
China's last empire, the Qing, lasted from 1644 to 1912. It began in violence and war as the Manchus swept down from the north, but invaders became emperors, with three generations of one family ruling the country. Among them, Michael Wood argues, was China's greatest emperor - Kangxi. Under the Qing, China doubled in size to include Xinjiang in the far west, as well as Mongolia and Tibet, creating the essential shape of China today. The new dynasty tolerated a diversity of cultures and religions, including Islam. In Kaifeng, Michael visits a women's mosque with a female imam, a delightful scene that ends with laughter and selfies! The Qing also undertook huge cultural enterprises. At a traditional printing house where the wood blocks are hand-carved, we see how the Complete Tang Poems were reproduced - all 48,000 of them. We travel through the wintry countryside to a remote village where a hardy audience watch open-air opera in the snow and visit a painter's studio, and 'storytelling' houses in Yangzhou. In the 18th century, China was arguably the greatest economy in the world, and we get a fabulous sense of the rich culture that came with prosperity. But then came the clash with the British, in the first Opium War, when a British expedition destroyed the Qing navy and extracted territory and trading rights. We leave with a glimpse of the future. 'Every dynasty has risen and declined,' says Michael, 'and has needed new life to regenerate, and this time the catalyst was the British.' Among the ports China ceded was an almost uninhabited island, Hong Kong, one of today's greatest financial centres, and Shanghai, a small town then but now one of the greatest cities in world.
Series: The Story of China

The Reality of Truth

   2016    Culture
This highly controversial documentary explores the relationship between, Spirituality, Religion, and Psychedelics. Lead by 'Zappy' Zapolin, the film explores the many myths about reality, and includes first of its kind interviews with top spiritual gurus, celebrities, and people of all faiths, about this intriguing connection, and their personal experiences with spirituality and transcendence.
Throughout history human beings have searched for gateways to spirituality that have included meditation, prayer, and natural substances. The Judeo Christian religions, Vedic traditions, and Shamanistic rituals, all incorporate techniques focused on transcending. Today scientists are able to measure the effects, real and perceived, on the human brain and mind. By exploring how to use the current knowledge and techniques available to society, we can tap into true spirituality, and awakening.

Jeong Kwan

   2017    Art
Chef's Table goes inside the lives and kitchens of six of the world's most renowned international chefs. Each episode focuses on a single chef and their unique look at their lives, talents and passion from their piece of culinary heaven.
Jeong Kwan is a not your regular defined chef. She's living as a monk in Korea. She is connected to the spiritual side of food. Instead of trying to be the best in the world, any sense of ego is stripped from her mind and she cooks from the soul. This episode follows the daily life of Jeong Kwan, as she lovingly prepares vegan 'temple food', using ages old recipes and natural ingredients. She is a humble genius. Inspirational and meditative, gorgeously shot. She is a tiny, calm, firebrand.
Series: Chef's Table

Christ of St John of the Cross by Salvador Dali

       Art
Salvador Dali's strange crucifixion is often called the greatest religious painting of the 20th century. Yet its artist was a notorious blasphemer some of whose work had outraged the Catholic Church. The Christ of St John of the Cross by Salvador Dali is the first of two extraordinary crucifixions painted by Dali in the early 1950s. The painting is based on a 'cosmic dream' Dali is said to have had, in which the nucleus of the atom was a figure of Christ himself.
The painting offers a surrealist view of the crucifixion of Christ, and is based on a drawing by the 16th century Spanish friar Saint John of the Cross. But Dali's vision was somewhat unique, using an unusual artistic perspective in which Christ is seen from above. His Christ of St. John of The Cross was inspired by a weird mix of Spanish mysticism and nuclear physics, with his Christ being modelled by a Hollywood stuntman. It's also a masterpiece of painting technique.
Series: The Private Life of a Masterpiece
Out of the Cradle
Out of the Cradle

   2019    History
The Last Dance
The Last Dance

   2020    Culture
How to Stay Young
How to Stay Young

   2016    Medicine
Galapagos
Galapagos

   2006    Nature
The Making of the Mob
The Making of the Mob

   2016    History
Reel Rock
Reel Rock

   2014    Culture
The Sound and the Fury
The Sound and the Fury

   2013    Art
The Crusades
The Crusades

   2012    History