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A Sky Full of Ghosts

   2014    Science
Tyson begins the episode by explaining the nature of the speed of light and how much of what is seen of the observable universe is from light emanated from billions of years in the past. Tyson further explains how modern astronomy has used such analyzes via deep time to identify the Big Bang event and the age of the universe. Tyson proceeds to describe how the work of Isaac Newton, William Herschel, and James Clerk Maxwell contributed to understanding the nature of electromagnetic waves and gravitational force, and how this work led towards Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity, that the speed of light is a fundamental constant of the universe and gravity can be seen as distortion of the fabric of space-time. Tyson describes the concept of dark stars as postulated by John Michell which are not visible but detectable by tracking other stars trapped within their gravity wells, an idea Herschel used to discover binary stars. Tyson then describes the nature of black holes, their enormous gravitational forces that can even capture light, and their discovery via X-ray sources such as Cygnus X-1. Tyson uses the Ship of Imagination to provide a postulate of the warping of spacetime and time dilation as one enters the event horizon of the black hole, and the possibility that these may lead to other points within our universe or others, or even time travel. Tyson ends on noting that Herschel's son, John would be inspired by his father to continue to document the known stars as well as contributions towards photography that play on the same nature of deep time used by astronomers.
Series: Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

AlphaGo

   2017    Technology
With more board configurations than there are atoms in the observable universe, the ancient Chinese game of 'Go' has long been considered a grand challenge for artificial intelligence. On March 9, 2016, the worlds of Go and AI collided in South Korea for an extraordinary best-of-five-game competition, coined the Google DeepMind Challenge Match. Hundreds of millions of people around the world watched as a legendary Go master took on an unproven AI challenger for the first time in history.
AlphaGo chronicles a journey from the halls of Cambridge, through the backstreets of Bordeaux, past the coding terminals of DeepMind in London, and, ultimately, to the seven-day tournament in Seoul. As the drama unfolds, more questions emerge: What can artificial intelligence reveal about a 3000-year-old game? What can it teach us about human mind?

Edge of the Universe

   2019    Science
Does the universe, have a limit? Does the universe have an edge? Looking out to the edge of the universe is tremendously important to understand our place in the cosmos and to understand the universe itself.
Inflation was a formative moment for our universe. By the time it stopped, the universe's basic characteristics were set. There could be regions of the greater universe where inflation didn't stop then. Occasionally a little region will stop inflating and just expand at the normal rate. We could imagine a super large-scale structure where there's different regions of the universe, domains, and each domain has different local constants and laws of physics.
Series: How the Universe Works Series 8
Reel Rock
Reel Rock

   2015    Culture
Ancient Aliens
Ancient Aliens

   2014    Culture
Leaving Neverland
Leaving Neverland

   2019    Culture
Reel Rock
Reel Rock

   2014    Culture
The Nazis, A Warning From History
The Nazis, A Warning From History

   1997    History
Cooked
Cooked

   2016    Culture
The Human Body
The Human Body

   1998    Medicine