Last Watched

"Anthropology and Sociology"  Sort by

Cooked: Air

   2016    Culture
Of the four elements, air is the most elusive because we can't see it. There's something very magical about it. One of the ways we transform food is by getting air into it. Think of the soufflé, think of the loaf of bread. These things are elevated by the fact that they now contain air. They're ethereal. Visit food labs and Moroccan fields as Michael Pollan delves into the science of bread-making and the nature of gluten.
Series: Cooked

Tofu: Good Sex Bad Sex

   2015    Culture
Journalist and Youtuber Benjamin Cook hosts everyday people discussing a variety of attitudes towards sex. Tofu offers a 'honest, non-judgemental and entertaining view of sex and sexuality'

Heart of a Dog

   2015    Culture
Laurie Anderson embarks on a cinematic journey through love, death and language. Cantering on Anderson's beloved rat terrier Lolabelle, who died in 2011, the film is a personal essay that weaves together childhood memories, video diaries, philosophical musings on data collection, surveillance culture and the Buddhist conception of the afterlife, and heartfelt tributes to the artists, writers, musicians and thinkers who inspire her. Fusing her own witty, inquisitive narration with original violin compositions, hand-drawn animation, 8mm home movies and artwork culled from exhibitions past and present, Anderson creates a hypnotic, collage-like visual language out of the raw materials of her life and art, examining how stories are constructed and told - and how we use them to make sense of our lives.

Cooked: Earth

   2016    Culture
All cooking is transformation, and in that sense, it's miraculous, it's alchemy. But of all the different transformations we call cooking, fermentation is the most miraculous and the most mysterious. And that's because it doesn't involve any applied heat at all. Discover how microbes help turn raw ingredients into delicacies like chocolate and cheese as Pollan tackles the mysterious process of fermentation.
Series: Cooked

Walking with Cavemen: The Survivors

   2003    History
Nearly half a million years ago, the most advanced human yet roams Europe. Strong and powerful, Homo heidelbergensis are fierce hunters, use sophisticated tools and live in close-knit family groups. Over 200,000 years they become split into two populations by extremes of weather and environment and evolve separately into two very different species. In the North are the Neanderthals, whose physical power and resilience is the key to surviving in ice age Northern Europe. About 140,000 years ago, Africa is in the grip of a devastating drought, and something remarkable has happened to the descendants of heidelbergensis who live there. The combination of environment and chance has bred in them a unique ability that will change the course of human history. It will be this small band of southern survivors, perhaps numbering just a few tens of thousands, who will come to dominate the world and be known as Homo sapiens.
Series: Walking with Cavemen
A Traveler Guide to the Planets
A Traveler Guide to the Planets

   2010    Science
Conversations with Dolphins
Conversations with Dolphins

   2016    Science
Art of Spain
Art of Spain

   2008    Art
Planet Earth II
Planet Earth II

   2016    Nature
Nature Great Events
Nature Great Events

   2009    Nature
Vice
Vice

   2013    Culture
Colour The Spectrum of Science
Colour The Spectrum of Science

   2015    Science
Stephen Hawking's Favorite Places
Stephen Hawking's Favorite Places

   2016    Science