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Ants: Secret Power of the Nature

   2011    Nature
In this documentary we will be transported into the world of ants. What animal has achieved immortality? What animal is the most warlike? What animal has the greatest supercity on the planet? Not man but ants. They are the real success story. It is only their tiny size and our vanity that allows us to hold onto the myth of our supremacy. Ants rule the planet. They are found in more habitats from far northern Finland to the sweltering tropics. The largest colony known of these insects is in Japan, where 306 million ants, with 1 million queens, in 45,000 colonies spread over 270 hectares. The fiercest warriors on earth are the slave maker ants. Other ants have barracks and sentry posts to protect themselves against surprise attack.

Big Bugs

   2012    Nature    3D
The world of bugs normally passes beneath our notice, yet shrink yourself to their size, see them in 3D and you’ll enter a world you’d never believe existed. Big Bugs in 3D uses specially developed 3D technology to take the viewer on a global journey, from Mexico and the rainforests of Asia to our own backyards. There are perhaps four and a half million different kinds of bugs sharing the planet with us. They exist in a bewildering variety of forms, some more like creatures from an alien world. Big Bugs asks how and why these creatures have become so successful.

Bugs a Rainforest Adventure

   2007    Nature    3D
Explore the extraordinary hidden world of insects, where a leaf weighs more than a car, rain drops feel like exploding hand grenades and a blade of grass soars like a skyscraper. Shot on location in the Borneo rainforest, Bugs! brings the beautiful and dangerous universe of its tiny stars up close and personal with cutting-edge technology that magnifies them up to 250,000 times their normal size. Don't miss this unforgettable, stunning film that reveals the dramatic, savage and awe-inspiring lives of these fascinating creatures. Bugs! A Rainforest Adventure is an extraordinay Imax 3-D film featuring macro photography of exceedingly high quality. Narrated by Judi Dench

Dragons of the Dry

   2008    Nature
About 340 million years ago a brand new family of animals was evolving in the primeval swamps. They were to go one step further than the amphibians who had emerged onto dry and before them. For they would eventually completely cut their ties with water. They were the ancestors of todays lizards. They evolved scaly impermeable skins and moved up into the forests. They diversified into a multitude of different shapes and sizes. They developed signalling systems to communicate with one another. And they squabbled as animals do. For food they hunted insects that were already well established on the land in great numbers. And here without returning to water they produced their families. They powered their bodies not only with food but with the heat that they drew directly from the sun.
As they diversified so they spread into the harshest of the lands habitats. The baking waterless deserts which eventually they would come to dominate. Discover jacky lizards that wave, wrestling beaded lizards and the the world's smallest chameleon, which is no bigger than his thumbnail, and the biggest lizard in Australia.
Series: Life In Cold Blood

Flowering

   1995    Nature
The third episode is devoted to the ways in which plants reproduce. Pollen and a stigma are the two components needed for fertilisation. Most plants carry both these within their flowers and rely on animals to transport the pollen from one to the stigma of another. To do this, they attract their couriers with colour, scent and nectar. It isn't just birds that help pollination: some mammals and reptiles also do so. However, it is mostly insects that are recruited to carry out the task. To ensure that pollen is not wasted by being delivered to the wrong flower, some species of plant have developed exclusive relationships with their visitors, and the gentian and its attendant carpenter bees is one example. Since pollen can be expensive to produce in terms of calories, some plants, such as orchids, ration it by means of pollinia and a strategically placed landing platform. Other orchids offer no reward for pollination, but instead mislead their guests by mimicking their markings and aroma, thus enticing males to 'mate' with them (Pseudocopulation). The most extreme fertilisation method is one of imprisonment, and one plant that uses it is the dead horse arum. It is often found near gull colonies, and mimics the appearance and smell of rotting flesh. Blow-flies are attracted to it, and are forced to stay the night before being allowed to depart in the morning, laden with pollen. Finally, Attenborough introduces the world's largest inflorescence: that of the titan arum.
Series: The Private Life of Plants
Neanderthal
Neanderthal

      History
How Art Made the World
How Art Made the World

   2006    Art
Zeitgeist
Zeitgeist

   2007    Culture
Capitalism A Love Story
Capitalism A Love Story

   2009    Culture
Cosmos
Cosmos

   1980    Science
The Life of Mammals
The Life of Mammals

   2002    Nature
How Earth Made Us
How Earth Made Us

   2010    Science
Oceans
Oceans

   2009    Nature