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Coming of Age In The Anthropocene

   2020    Nature
At 11 o'clock on New Year's Eve of the Cosmic Calendar, Homo erectus stood up for the first time, freeing its hands and earning the species its name. They began to move around, to explore, daring to risk everything to get to unknown places. Our Neanderthal relatives lived much as we did and did many of the things we consider to be 'human.' More restless than their cousins the Neanderthals and Denisovans, our Homo sapiens ancestors crossed seas and unforgiving landscapes, changing the land, ocean and atmosphere, leading to mass extinction. The scientific community gave our age a new name, 'Anthropocene.'
Since the first civilizations we've wondered if there's something about human nature that contains the seeds of our destruction. Syukuro Manabe was born in rural Japan and took an intense interest in Earth's average global temperature. In the 1960's, he would assemble the evidence he needed to predict the increase of Earth's temperature due to greenhouse gases until it becomes an uninhabitable and toxic environment, leading to our extinction. 'This doesn't have to be,' says Neil deGrasse Tyson, 'it's not too late. There's another hallway, another future we can still have; we'll find a way.'
Series: Cosmos: Possible Worlds

Humans

   2021    Nature
A new force threatens our perfect planet. In the past, five mass extinction events were caused by cataclysmic volcanic eruptions. It was not the lava or ash that wiped out life, but an invisible gas released by volcanoes: carbon dioxide. Almost every part of modern life depends on energy created by burning fossil fuels, and this produces CO2 in huge amounts. Humans are changing our planet so rapidly, it’s affecting earth’s life support systems: our weather, our oceans and the living world. The greatest change to be made is in how we create energy, and the planet is brimming with natural power that can help us do just that. It’s these forces of nature - the wind, the sun, waves and geothermal energy - that hold the key to our future.
Through compelling animal-led stories and expert interviews, we discover how CO2 is destabilising our planet. We meet rescued orphaned elephants in Kenya, victims of ever worsening droughts, and join ocean patrols off the coast of Gabon fighting to save endangered sharks. In the Amazon, we witness wildlife teams saving animals in the shrinking forests, and in San Diego we enter a cryogenic zoo preserving the DNA of endangered species before they become extinct.
Series: A Perfect Planet

Clean Our Air

   2021    Nature
We routinely talk about healthy food and clean water, but how often do we spare a thought for what enters our lungs? The World Health Organization calls air pollution the silent killer. Air pollution is proven to shorten our lifetimes and it hits the vulnerable - children, the sick and the elderly - hardest of all.
Prince William, Sir David Attenborough and astronaut Naoko Yamazaki hear the personal stories of people who are directly affected by air pollution and show us incredible solutions.
Series: The Earthshot Prize: Repairing Our Planet

Revive Our Oceans

   2021    Nature
Seafood is a substantial part of the daily diet of over three billion people and oceans absorbs almost a third of all the greenhouse gases we emits. Buy the ocean it is not what it once was. Scenes of extraordinary ocean abundance now only exist in far-off places or in tales from the past. We urgently need to mend our relationship with our oceans and allow them to thrive once again.
Prince William, David Attenborough and Shakira find out about inspiring people and projects across the world that can help us stop damaging the oceans and enable their revival.
Series: The Earthshot Prize: Repairing Our Planet
Welcome to Earth

Welcome to Earth

2021  Nature
Rome Second Season

Rome Second Season

  History
Zeitgeist

Zeitgeist

2007  Culture
Chemistry

Chemistry

2010  Science
Clarkson Farm

Clarkson Farm

2021  Nature
The Story of Maths

The Story of Maths

2008  Science
Minimalism

Minimalism

2015  Culture