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Simply the Best Documentaries

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Whale Killer
Walking with Cavemen: First Ancestors
What the Health
Beyond the Darkness
Factories of Death
How to Make Money Selling Drugs
Swallowed by a Black Hole
Deliver Us from Drought
Monster we met: The End of Eden
Conquest of the Skies The first to flight
Ivory Tower
Planet Earth II Islands
Legends of Flight
Evolutions: The Walking Whale
Planet Dinosaur Ultimate Killers
Human Universe: What is our Future
Enigma Man
To Fly or Not to Fly
Top Science Stories of 2017
Hidden Kingdoms: Under Open Skies
Upgrade
Journey to the Edge of the Universe
Is Gun Crime a Virus
Astrobiology
A Winning Design
Great Cathedral Mystery
David Attenborough Meets President Obama
Sea of Cortez
Who is God
Fear
Marvel Studios: Assembling a Universe
The True Cost
Can Time Go Backwards
The Art of Germany: A Divided Land
The Mediterranean Sea
Project Nim

Order by   Views  Year  New Added  Featured  Title

Dancing in the Dark
Dancing in the Dark 2015

Scientists genuinely don't know what most of our universe is made of. The atoms we're made from only make up four per cent. The rest is dark matter and dark energy (for 'dark', read 'don't know'). The Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been upgraded. When it's switched on in March 2015, its collisions will have twice the energy they did before. The hope is that scientists will discover the identity of dark matter in the debris. The stakes are high - because if dark matter fails to show itself, it might mean that physics itself needs a rethink.

Category:Science  Duration:59:00   

The Day they Dropped the Bomb
The Day they Dropped the Bomb 2015

August 6th 1945 marked the start of a terrifying new episode in human history. This documentary marks the 70th anniversary of the day when the world's first atomic bomb was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima by a Boeing B-29 USAF Superfortress bomber, nicknamed Enola Gay after the pilot's mother". Up to 80,000 people - 30 per cent of the population - were killed by the blast and resulting firestorm and over 70,000 were injured. This documentary gives a minute-by-minute account of what happened on that fateful day, through the testimony of people who were there and rarely-seen archive footage from the time. Made on location in Hiroshima and the USA, it features unique interviews with eyewitnesses who have seldom, if ever, spoken about the experience. Several of them are no longer alive, they include the last surviving member of the crew of the Enola Gay - navigator Dutch Van Kirk who died in July 2014.

Category:History  Duration:55:00   

Big Bang Machine
Big Bang Machine 2015

On July 4, 2012, scientists at the giant atom smashing facility at CERN announced the discovery of a subatomic particle that seems like a tantalizingly close match to the elusive Higgs Boson, thought to be responsible for giving all the stuff in the universe its mass. Since it was first proposed nearly fifty years ago, the Higgs has been the holy grail of particle physicists: finding it completes the 'standard model" that underlies all of modern particle physics. Now CERN's scientists are preparing for the Large Hadron Collider's second act, when they restart the history-making collider, running at higher energy--hoping to find the next great discovery that will change what we know about the particles and forces that make up our universe.

Category:Technology  Duration:54:00   

Let there be Life
Let there be Life 2014

Professor of physics Jim Al-Khalili investigates the most accurate and yet perplexing scientific theory ever - quantum physics, the perplexing theory of sub-atomic particles. Turning his attention to the world of nature, can quantum mechanics explain the greatest mysteries in biology? The European robin navigates using one of the most bizarre effects in physics - quantum entanglement, a process which seems to defy common sense. Jim finds that even the most personal of human experiences - our sense of smell - is touched by ethereal quantum vibrations. According to new experiments it seems that our quantum noses are listening to smells. Jim discovers that the most famous law of quantum physics - the uncertainty principle - is obeyed by plants and trees as they capture sunlight during the vital process of photosynthesis. Jim wonders if the strange laws of the sub-atomic world, which allow objects to tunnel through impassable barriers in defiance of common sense, could effect the mechanism by which living species evolve?

Category:Science  Duration:59:00   Series: The Secrets of Quantum Physics

 
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