Documentarymania

Simply the Best Documentaries

 Share on Twitter  Share on Google+
Who is God
Journey to the Edge of the Universe
Fear
Marvel Studios: Assembling a Universe
The True Cost
Can Time Go Backwards
The Art of Germany: A Divided Land
The Mediterranean Sea
Project Nim
Magnificent Desolation Walking on the Moon
Michael Jackson Journey from Motown to Off the Wall
Homo Interneticus
How to Grow a Planet Life from Light
The Birth of Israel
Cosmos Carl Sagan: The Shores of the Cosmic Ocean
Reel Rock 10
The Great European Disaster Movie
Top Science Stories of 2017
The Buddha
The Virus of Faith
Man on Mars Mission to the Red Planet
Cave of Forgotten Dreams
Einsteins Nightmare
Clash of the Gods: Hades
Planet Earth II Deserts
Amazing Africa
How to Live Longer
The Worst Car in the History of the World
Caves
Charles Darwin and the Tree of Life
Stem Cell Universe with Stephen Hawking
Lord of Asia
Rivals
Addicted to Sexting
A Leap of Faith
Ice

Order by   Views  Year  New Added  Featured  Title

Charles Darwin and the Tree of Life
Charles Darwin and the Tree of Life 2009

David Attenborough asks three key questions: how and why did Darwin come up with his theory of evolution? Why do we think he was right? And why is it more important now than ever before? David starts his journey in Darwin's home at Down House in Kent, where Darwin worried and puzzled over the origins of life. David goes back to his roots in Leicestershire, where he hunted for fossils as a child, and where another schoolboy unearthed a significant find in the 1950s. And he revisits Cambridge University, where both he and Darwin studied, and where many years later the DNA double helix was discovered, providing the foundations for genetics. At the end of his journey in the Natural History Museum in London, David concludes that Darwin's great insight revolutionised the way in which we see the world. We now understand why there are so many different species, and why they are distributed in the way they are. But above all, Darwin has shown us that we are not set apart from the natural world, and do not have dominion over it. We are subject to its laws and processes, as are all other animals on earth to which, indeed, we are related.

Category:Science  Duration:59:30   

Triumph of Life: The Four Billion Year War
Triumph of Life: The Four Billion Year War  2006

A compelling new vision of the epic forces that have shaped every aspect of existence on our planet. Life on this planet has fought a ceaseless battle for survival since it first appeared some four billion years ago. Yet out of this eternal conflict has emerged the overwhelming richness and diversity we see around us. Exploring this paradox, Triumph of Life begins with a penetrating look at the process of evolution and the driving force behind it - genes.

Category:Nature  Duration:55:00   Series: Triumph of Life

Becoming Human: First Steps
Becoming Human: First Steps 2010

Where did we come from? What makes us human? Groundbreaking investigation explores how new discoveries are transforming views of our earliest ancestors. Featuring interviews with world-renowned scientists, footage shot in the trenches as fossils were unearthed, and stunning computer-generated animation, Becoming Human brings early hominids to life, examining how they lived and how we became the creative and adaptable modern humans of today. In the first episode Selam, the amazingly complete remains of a 3 million year-old child, packed with clues to why we split from the apes, came down from the trees, and started walking upright.

Category:History  Duration:53:02   Series: Becoming Human

Ape Man: Search for the First Human
Ape Man: Search for the First Human 2005

After eight grueling years of hunting in the hot, wind-scoured desert of central Africa, an international team of researchers has uncovered one of the most sensational fossil finds in living memory: the well-preserved 7 million years old skull of a chimp-size animal, probably a male, that doesn't fit any known species. According to paleontologist Michel Brunet of the University of Poitiers in France, whose team reported the find in Nature last week, there is no way it could have been an ape of any kind. It was almost certainly a hominid — a member of a subdivision of the primate family whose only living representative is modern man.

Category:Science  Duration:47:12   

 
Showing 21- 24  of 56   <<   <   >   >>  

Follow our releases!



In  Facebook  


© Documentary Mania 2017