Simply the Best Documentaries

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Amazing Ocean
Worst Days on Planet Earth
Turtle Power The Definitive History of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Did God Have a Wife
South Pacific Fragile Paradise
Marvel Studios: Assembling a Universe
Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways
Ancient Rome: Caesar
Deep Sea
Secrets of the Sun
Addicted to Sexting
Magnificent Desolation Walking on the Moon
Humpback Whales
Born to Be Wild
Building the Great Pyramid
Ocean Wonderland 3D
The Private Life of Plants: Travelling
10 Things You Need to Know about the Future
Earthflight North America
Stephen Hawking Favorite Places II
The Universe: 7 Wonders of the Solar System
The Most Dangerous Band in the World. The Story of Guns N Roses
Solving the Secrets
Cooked: Earth
Marvel 75 Years: From Pulp to Pop!
The Fantastic Mr Feynman
Stephen Hawking Favorite Places III
Asia and Australia

Order by   Views  Year  New Added  Featured  Title

Flowering 1995

The third episode is devoted to the ways in which plants reproduce. Pollen and a stigma are the two components needed for fertilisation. Most plants carry both these within their flowers and rely on animals to transport the pollen from one to the stigma of another. To do this, they attract their couriers with colour, scent and nectar. It isn't just birds that help pollination: some mammals and reptiles also do so. However, it is mostly insects that are recruited to carry out the task. To ensure that pollen is not wasted by being delivered to the wrong flower, some species of plant have developed exclusive relationships with their visitors, and the gentian and its attendant carpenter bees is one example. Since pollen can be expensive to produce in terms of calories, some plants, such as orchids, ration it by means of pollinia and a strategically placed landing platform. Other orchids offer no reward for pollination, but instead mislead their guests by mimicking their markings and aroma, thus enticing males to 'mate' with them (Pseudocopulation). The most extreme fertilisation method is one of imprisonment, and one plant that uses it is the dead horse arum. It is often found near gull colonies, and mimics the appearance and smell of rotting flesh. Blow-flies are attracted to it, and are forced to stay the night before being allowed to depart in the morning, laden with pollen. Finally, Attenborough introduces the world's largest inflorescence: that of the titan arum.

Category:Nature  Duration:49:00   Series: The Private Life of Plants

The Atlantic
The Atlantic 2009

The Atlantic is the second largest ocean on the planet. It is the resting place of the Titanic, home to the mysterious Bermuda Triangle and is the youngest of the Earth's great oceans. It reaches depths of 8,500 metres. Oceans investigates this influential body of water from a group of islands in its western reaches - the Bahamas.

Category:Nature  Duration:58:00   Series: Oceans

Some of the Things That Molecules Do
Some of the Things That Molecules Do 2014

The story begins with Tyson sitting at a campfire, and telling how the wolf changed through artificial selection, and selective breeding into the dog breeds around today. He then enters the Ship of Imagination, and explains natural selection with the process that helped to create the polar bears. Along the way he talks about DNA, genes and mutation. Next he goes to a forest and describes the Tree of life, this leads him to discussing the evolution of the eye. He then discusses extinction, by going to a monument called the Halls of Extinction, dedicated to the broken branches of the tree of life. Explaining the five great Extinction events. He then tells how some life has survived, and then focuses on the tardigrade. From there he talks about what other kinds of life might have been created on other worlds. He then goes to Saturn's moon Titan. From there he speculates about life and how it first began. He then returns to Earth and tells about abiogenesis and how life changed and evolved. The show ends with an animated sequence from the original series of life's evolution from one cell to humans.

Category:Science  Duration:43:00      Series: Cosmos 2014

Taking To The Air
Taking To The Air 2005

As the early June sun begins to set over a calm river in Central Hungary, masses of ghostly shapes emerge from their larval cases to take to the air for the first time. They are mayflies and in a spectacular display, thousands of them demonstrate how the very first wings were used. From the stunning aerobatics of hoverflies in an English garden to the mass migration of purple crow butterflies in the valleys of Taiwan, this episode tells the tale of the first animals ever to take to the air. Unique footage reveals the lightning fast reactions of bluebottles and hoverflies, filmed with one of the world's fastest cameras, and Sir David Attenborough handles the world's largest (and perhaps most ferocious) insect - the Titan beetle.

Category:Nature  Duration:50:00   Series: Life in the Undergrowth

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