Documentarymania

Simply the Best Documentaries

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Van Gogh
The Death of the Oceans
Insect Hunters
Birth of Humanity
That Sugar Film
Bitcoin: The End of Money As We Know It
Flying Monsters
Dark Net Rewire
Life: Reptiles and Amphibians
Deeper, Deeper, Deeper Still
The Immortals
Life: Fish
Maidentrip
Courtship
Hitchcock/Truffaut
Goya: Crazy Like A Genius
Ancient Aliens Debunked: Anunnaki
Dinosaurs Alive
Mammoths To Manhattan
Life of a Universe End of Days
Darwin Struggle - The Evolution of the Origin of Species
Ancient Rome: The Fall of Rome
Enemy of the Senate
How Did We Get... Here
Hunger at Sea
Which Universe Are We In
Living with Predators. Conservation
Hide and Seek. Forests
Deep Sea
Survival
Protestantism The Evangelical Explosion
Whale Killer
Does Time Really Exist
Rivals
Foreigners in their Own Land
The Story of India: The Power of Ideas

Order by   Views  Year  New Added  Featured  Title

The Last Lions
The Last Lions 2011

Fifty years ago there were close to half-a-million lions in Africa. Today there are around 20,000. To make matters worse, lions, unlike elephants, which are far more numerous, have virtually no protection under government mandate or through international accords. This is the jumping-off point for a disturbing, well-researched and beautifully made cri de coeur from husband and wife team Dereck and Beverly Joubert, award-winning filmmakers from Botswana who have been Explorers-in-Residence at National Geographic for more than four years. Pointing to poaching as a primary threat while noting the lion's pride of place on the list for eco-tourists-an industry that brings in 200 billion dollars per year worldwide-the Jouberts build a solid case for both the moral duty we have to protect lions (as well as other threatened "big cats," tigers among them) and the economic sense such protection would make. And when one takes into account the fact that big cats are at the very top of the food chain-and that their elimination would wreak havoc on all species below them, causing a complete ecosystem collapse-the need takes on a supreme urgency.

Category:Nature  Duration:01:28:00   

Survival
Survival 2012

David Attenborough discovers the plants that have evolved to shed their dependency on water enabling them to survive in the driest environments. The story begins at midnight in midsummer as David steps into the Princess of Wales Conservatory to witness the extraordinary nocturnal blooming of a cactus. The queen of the night, with its giant flowers, is the centre piece of a stunning symphony of cacti blooms that burst open in the desert (and at Kew) at night. In a mesmerizing 3D slow motion sequence, we discover the extraordinary connections between cacti and their natural pollinators: bats. As the sun rises, David meets other amazing plants. Species like the century plant, the Agave franzosini, which grows steadily for over 50 years, only to then flower itself to death with one mighty telegraph pole sized bloom which literally bursts out of the roof of Kew’s green house.

Category:Nature  Duration:52:24      Series: Kingdom of Plants

Life: Insects
Life: Insects 2009

There are 200 million insects for each of us. They are the most successful animal group ever. Their key is an armoured covering that takes on almost any shape. Darwin's stag beetle fights in the tree tops with huge curved jaws. The camera flies with millions of monarch butterflies which migrate 2000 miles, navigating by the sun. Super slow motion shows a bombardier beetle firing boiling liquid at enemies through a rotating nozzle. A honey bee army stings a raiding bear into submission. Grass cutter ants march like a Roman army, harvesting grass they cannot actually eat. They cultivate a fungus that breaks the grass down for them. Their giant colony is the closest thing in nature to the complexity of a human city.

Category:Nature  Duration:59:00   Series: Life

Life: Plants
Life: Plants 2009

Plants' solutions to life's challenges are as ingenious and manipulative as any animal's. Innovative time-lapse photography opens up a parallel world where plants act like fly-paper, or spring-loaded traps, to catch insects. Vines develop suckers and claws to haul themselves into the rainforest canopy. Every peculiar shape proves to have a clever purpose. The dragon's blood tree is like an upturned umbrella to capture mist and shade its roots. The seed of a Bornean tree has wings so aerodynamic they inspired the design of early gliders. The barrel-shaped desert rose is full of water. The heliconia plant even enslaves a humming bird and turns it into an addict for its nectar.

Category:Nature  Duration:59:00   Series: Life

 
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