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Simply the Best Documentaries

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The Hacker Wars
The Making of Jurassic Park
Fukushima Is Nuclear Power Safe
Turtle Power The Definitive History of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Amazing Ocean
Bomb It
When Did Time Begin
Living with Predators. Conservation
History of the Eagles 3 of 4
Making a Murderer Eighteen Years Lost
Making a Murderer Turning the Tables
Can We Cheat Death
Fight for Life
Requiem for the American Dream
Framing Defense
The 50s Eisenhower the Bomb and the Third World
Aftermath Population Zero
The Story of Maths To Infinity and Beyond
Wind
Russia Imperialist Warriors
Return to Jurassic Park
The Joy of Mozart
Walking with Monsters
IMAX Hubble
Awake The life of Yogananda
The Age of Revolution
The Brain What is Reality
That Sugar Film
Miracle Cure: A Decade of the Human Genome
Banking on Bitcoin
Nothing
The Story of India: Beginnings
Ape Man: Search for the First Human
Enemy of the Senate
One Life on the Limit
Deep Sea

Order by   Views  Year  New Added  Featured  Title

Out of Sight
Out of Sight 2012

The human eye is a remarkable piece of precision engineering, but it is also extremely limited. Beyond the narrow range of light that makes up the familiar colours of the rainbow is a vast spectrum of light, entirely unseen. Richard Hammond does just that, using ground-breaking new imaging technologies to take the viewer on a breath-taking journey of discovery beyond the visible spectrum, seeing the world, quite literally, in a whole new light. From death-defying aerial repairmen in the United States using ultraviolet cameras to seek out an invisible force that lurks unseen on power lines, to German scientists unlocking the secrets of animal locomotion with the world's most powerful moving x-ray camera, to infrared cameras that can finally reveal the secrets within a humble beehive, he shows how new technologies are letting us see our world anew.

Category:Science  Duration:   Series: Invisible Worlds

Planet Earth II Mountains
Planet Earth II Mountains 2016

The great mountain ranges are some of the planet's most spectacular landscapes, but they are unforgiving places to live in, and only a few animals have what it takes to live at extreme altitude. Mountain animals are amongst the most elusive in the world, and this film provides unique and intimate glimpses into their secretive lives. Witness the moment four snow leopards come together when a mother and cub become trapped between two rival males. Join grizzly bears as they dance against trees to rub off their winter fur and soar with golden eagles hunting amongst Europe's snow-capped peaks.

Category:Nature  Duration:58:09      Series: Planet Earth II

Growing
Growing 1994

The second episode is about how plants gain their sustenance. Sunlight is one of the essential requirements if a seed is to germinate, and Attenborough highlights the cheese plant as an example whose young shoots head for the nearest tree trunk and then climb to the top of the forest canopy, developing its leaves en route. Using sunshine, air, water and a few minerals, the leaves are, in effect, the "factories" that produce food. However, some, such as the begonia, can thrive without much light. To gain moisture, plants typically use their roots to probe underground. Trees pump water up pipes that run inside their trunks, and Attenborough observes that a sycamore can do this at the rate of 450 litres an hour — in total silence. Too much rainfall can clog up a leaf's pores, and many have specially designed 'gutters' to cope with it. However, their biggest threat is from animals, and some require extreme methods of defence, such as spines, camouflage, or poison. Some can move quickly to deter predators: the mimosa can fold its leaves instantly when touched, and the Venus flytrap eats insects by closing its leaves around its prey when triggered. Another carnivorous plant is the trumpet pitcher that snares insects when they fall into its tubular leaves. Attenborough visits Borneo to see the largest pitcher of them all, Nepenthes rajah, whose traps contain up to two litres of water and have been known to kill small rodents.

Category:Nature  Duration:49:00   Series: The Private Life of Plants

The Private Life of Plants Living Together
The Private Life of Plants Living Together 1995

The fifth programme explores the alliances formed between the animal and plant worlds. Attenborough dives into Australia's Great Barrier Reef and contrasts the nocturnal feeding of coral, on microscopic creatures, with its daytime diet of algae. Some acacias are protected by ants, which will defend their refuge from any predator. Besides accommodation, the guards are rewarded with nectar and, from certain species, protein for their larvae as well. Fungi feed on plants but can also provide essential nutriment to saplings (Mycorrhiza). The connection is never broken throughout a tree's life and a quarter of the sugars and starches produced in its leaves is channelled back to its fungal partners. Meanwhile, fungi that feed on dead wood leave a hollow trunk, which also benefits the tree. Orchids enjoy a similar affiliation. Lichens are the product of a relationship between fungi and a photosynthetic associate, usually algae. They are extremely slow-growing, and a graveyard is the perfect location to discover their exact longevity. Mistletoe is a hemiparasite that obtains its moisture from a host tree, while using own leaves to manufacture food. Its seeds are deposited on another by the mistletoe tyrannulet, following digestion of the fruit. The dodder (Cuscuta) is also parasitic, generally favouring nettles, and siphons its nourishment through periodic 'plugs' along its stem. The rafflesia has no stem or leaves and only emerges from its host in order to bloom — and it produces the largest single flower: one metre across.

Category:Nature  Duration:49:00   Series: The Private Life of Plants

 
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