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Simply the Best Documentaries

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American Serengeti
Edge Of The Ice
Reagan Gorbachev and Third World: Rise Of The Right
Jungles
Egypt on the Brink
Survival
Messengers
Blood Of The Vikings: First Blood
Microscopic Universe
Life: Reptiles and Amphibians
Deep Web
When Knowledge Conquered Fear
Arabia
How to Grow a Planet Life from Light
Top Science Stories of 2016
Atlantis Found
Journey Through Space
Requiem for the American Dream
Is the Force With Us
Bear Necessities
Planet Dinosaur Ultimate Killers
Easy Listening
Winter on Fire
Raging Teens
Unlocking the Great Pyramid
To the Bitter End
Ancient Rome: The Fall of Rome
Who Will We Be
The Hacker Wars
The Making of Jurassic Park
Fukushima Is Nuclear Power Safe
Turtle Power The Definitive History of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Amazing Ocean
Bomb It
When Did Time Begin
Living with Predators. Conservation

Order by   Views  Year  New Added  Featured  Title

The Private Life of Plants: Travelling
The Private Life of Plants: Travelling 1994

Sir David Attenborough reveals plants as they have never been seen before - on the move and dangerously devious. About the major problems of life - growing, finding food, reproduction - and the varied ways plants have evolved to solve it. Filmed from the plant's point of view, using computer animations, fibre-optics and unique time-lapse photography. The first episode looks at how plants are able to move". The bramble is an aggressive example: it advances forcefully from side to side and, once settled on its course, there is little that can stand in its way. An altogether faster species is the birdcage plant, which inhabits Californian sand dunes. When its location becomes exposed, it shifts at great speed to another one with the assistance of wind — and it is this that allows many forms of vegetation to distribute their seeds. While not strictly a plant, the spores of fungi are also spread in a similar fashion. One of the most successful (and intricate) flowers to use the wind is the dandelion, whose seeds travel with the aid of 'parachutes'. They are needed to travel miles away from their parents, who are too densely packed to allow any new arrivals. Trees have the advantage of height to send their seeds further, and the cottonwood is shown as a specialist in this regard. The humidity of the tropical rainforest creates transportation problems, and the liana-species Alsomitra macrocarpa is one plant whose seeds are aerodynamic 'gliders'. Some, such as those of the sycamore, take the form of 'helicopters', while others, such as the squirting cucumber release their seeds by 'exploding'. Water is also a widely used method of propulsion. The tropical sea bean Entada gigas has one of the biggest fruits of all plants and is dispersed by water streams. However, most plants use living couriers, whether they be dogs, humans and other primates, ants or birds, etc., and to that end, they use colour and smell to signify when they are ripe for picking.

Category:Nature  Duration:49:00   Series: The Private Life of Plants

Van Gogh
Van Gogh 2006

Born in Groot-Zundert, The Netherlands, Van Gogh spent his early life as an art dealer, teacher and preacher in England, Holland and Belgium. His period as an artist began in 1881 when he chose to study art in Brussels, starting with watercolours and moving quickly on to oils. The French countryside was a major influence on his life and his early work was dominated by sombre, earthy colours depicting peasant workers, the most famous of which is The Potato Eaters, 1885. It was during Van Gogh's studies in Paris (1886-8) that he developed the individual style of brushwork and use of colour that made his name. In 1888 he moved to Arles where the Provençal landscape provided his best-known subject matter. However, it also marked the start of his mental crisis following an argument with his contemporary Paul Gauguin. Van Gogh was committed to a mental asylum in 1889 where he continued to paint, but he committed suicide in 1890.

Category:Art  Duration:60:00   Series: Power of Art

Out of Sight
Out of Sight 2012

The human eye is a remarkable piece of precision engineering, but it is also extremely limited. Beyond the narrow range of light that makes up the familiar colours of the rainbow is a vast spectrum of light, entirely unseen. Richard Hammond does just that, using ground-breaking new imaging technologies to take the viewer on a breath-taking journey of discovery beyond the visible spectrum, seeing the world, quite literally, in a whole new light. From death-defying aerial repairmen in the United States using ultraviolet cameras to seek out an invisible force that lurks unseen on power lines, to German scientists unlocking the secrets of animal locomotion with the world's most powerful moving x-ray camera, to infrared cameras that can finally reveal the secrets within a humble beehive, he shows how new technologies are letting us see our world anew.

Category:Science  Duration:   Series: Invisible Worlds

Do You See What I See
Do You See What I See 2011

Roses are red, violets are blue but according to the latest understanding these colours are really an illusion. One that you create yourself. Horizon reveals a surprising truth about how we all see the world. You may think a rose is red, the sky is blue and the grass is green, but it now seems that the colours you see may not always be the same as the colours I see. Your age, sex and even mood can affect how you experience colours. Scientists have unlocked the hidden power that colours can have over your life - how red can make you a winner, how blue makes time speed up. Watch an experiment where for people in a blue pod, a minute lasts 11 seconds shorter.

Category:Medicine  Duration:59:10   

 
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