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The Invisible Universe

   2018    Science
It is one of the most unnerving discoveries in space science - that most of the universe is missing. We live in a material world, so instinctively we know what normal matter is - the world around us, the planets, stars and interstellar dust. But scientists currently estimate that 95 per cent of everything in the universe is actually - one way or another - invisible.
Some of this is ordinary matter that we just can't easily see. But there's also stuff that's much more weird. For instance, there's a new kind of matter we think is out there, but whose very existence is still largely hypothetical - dark matter. And most mysteriously of all, scientists think there is an unknown form of energy pervading the universe that we know so little about, all it has so far is a name - dark energy. Embark on a tour of this invisible universe, and shows how its existence - or lack of it - will define the fate of the entire universe.
Series: The Sky at Night

First Second of the Big Bang

   2014    Science
The first second of the Universe, the creation of everything when space, time, matter and energy burst into existence. It is the most important second in history, which seals the Universe's fate and defines everything that comes after - including us.
Series: How the Universe Works

David Attenborough Meets President Obama

   2015    Nature
In a far cry from the steamy jungles of Rwanda or the icy waters of the Arctic, British naturalist Sir David Attenborough has donned a necktie and met with US president Barack Obama to discuss climate change and the future of the planet. The two met at the White House — a place the naturalist had never yet explored — on Sir David's 89th birthday in May to film the interview". It was the first time the respected wildlife filmmaker had met an American president and he seemed a little awed by the experience. Mr Obama, who grew up watching Sir David's programs, seemed equally thrilled. The president has the environment and climate change on his radar and is anxious to see progress made as his presidency comes to a close. He faces stiff opposition from Republicans in Congress on his plans to tackle climate change, but remains determined to make changes before leaving office. "I don't have much patience for anyone who denies that this challenge is real," he said. "We don't have time for a meeting of the Flat Earth Society." Sir David, who has been called "the godfather of natural history TV" by the BBC, brought to the meeting six decades dedicated to sharing the wonders of the natural world with television audiences. After initially being rejected for television because his teeth were deemed "too big", Sir David went on to make his Life on Earth television series, which has been watched by more than 500 million people worldwide. His name is now synonymous with nature, conservation and wildlife. During the television interview, the men discussed global warming, renewable energy and how children and young people hold the key to reversing the damage.

Dancing in the Dark

   2015    Science
Scientists genuinely don't know what most of our universe is made of. The atoms we're made from only make up four per cent. The rest is dark matter and dark energy (for 'dark', read 'don't know'). The Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been upgraded. When it's switched on in March 2015, its collisions will have twice the energy they did before. The hope is that scientists will discover the identity of dark matter in the debris. The stakes are high - because if dark matter fails to show itself, it might mean that physics itself needs a rethink.

The Quasar Enigma

   2018    Science    HD
Mysterious lights shine out from the edge of space, brighter than a trillion suns. They had to be the brightest objects we've ever seen in the universe, putting out amounts of energy that we couldn't possibly explain. So powerful, they can incinerate planets and rip stars to pieces. These are among the most mysterious and most energetic phenomenon in the universe. They can destroy galaxies, but may also be the key to their survival. These objects are a hotbed of all kinds of crazy physics. These celestial powerhouses are called quasars, and we may owe them our very existence.
Series: How the Universe Works Season 6
Inside the Medieval Mind
Inside the Medieval Mind

   2008    History
Frozen Planet
Frozen Planet

   2011    Nature
Vegan
Vegan

   2017    Culture
Survivors Guide to Prison
Survivors Guide to Prison

   2018    Culture
Black Hole Apocalypse
Black Hole Apocalypse

   2018    Science
Depeche Mode: Live in Berlin
Depeche Mode: Live in Berlin

   2014    Art
Everything and Nothing
Everything and Nothing

   2011    Science
The Incredible Human Journey
The Incredible Human Journey

   2009    History