Last Watched

"Yes"  Sort by

Atlas Maps

   2010    History
The Dutch Golden Age saw map-making reach a fever pitch of creative and commercial ambition. This was the era of the first ever Atlases - elaborate, lavish and beautiful. This was the great age of discovery and marked an unprecedented opportunity for mapmakers who sought to record and categorise the newly acquired knowledge of the world. Rising above the many mapmakers in this period was Gerard Mercator, inventor of the Mercator projection, who changed mapmaking forever when he published his collection of world maps in 1598 and coined the term 'Atlas'. The programme looks at some of the largest and most elaborate maps ever produced, from the vast maps on the floor of the Royal Palace in Amsterdam, to the 24 volume atlas covering just the Netherlands, to the largest Atlas in the world, The Klencke Atlas. It was made for Charles II to mark his restoration in 1660. But whilst being one of the British Libraries most important items, it is also one of its most fragile so hardly ever opened. This is a unique opportunity to see inside this enormous and lavish work, and see the world through the eyes of a King.
Series: The Beauty of Maps

Avatar: Creating the World of Pandora

   2010    Art
Are you still in awe of what James Cameron did with Avatar? You still wondering how Cameron could pull off something so visually wondrous when other SFX companies don’t even come close to matching it? If you answered yes to any of those questions (or having a passing interest) then you should check out this behind-the-scenes featurette, Creating The World of Pandora

Bear Necessities

   2008    Science
One animal embodies all that is amazing about survival. It has adapted to wildly varying habitats and evolved unique weapons of survival; its greatest asset is its ferocious bite and it is evolutions ultimate survivor, but what species is it? Find out if a new bear species could be about to evolve before our very eyes.
Series: Evolutions

Beyond the Rainbow

   2015    Science
Helen Czerski ventures beyond the visible spectrum in the final (and best) episode in this vibrant series, showing how electromagnetic radiation is so much broader than the narrow slice of reality we see with our eyes. Before delving into the details of UV, infrared and x-rays, Dr Czerski explores colour subjectivity by trying on a dress that recently divided the internet — to some it appeared blue and black, to others white and gold. It's a perfect fit. It's also a neat analogy of how people can have opposing views but both swear blind that their perspective is correct. The series ends with some amazing imaging techniques that show our bodies in a whole new light.
Series: Colour The Spectrum of Science

Caves

   2007    Nature
The Cave of Swallows in Mexico is a 400m vertical shaft, deep enough to engulf the Empire State Building. The Lechuguilla cave system in the USA is 193km long and 500m deep with astonishing crystal formations hanging from its chambers. Although often overlooked, caves are remarkable habitats with equally bizarre wildlife. Cave angel fish cling to the walls behind cave waterfalls with microscopic hooks on their flattened fins. Cave swiftlets navigate by echo-location and build nests out of saliva. The Texas cave salamander has neither eyes nor pigment. Unique access to a hidden world of stalactites, stalagmites, snotites and troglodytes brings a wealth of surprises.
Series: Planet Earth
The Life of Birds
The Life of Birds

   1998    Nature
Planet Earth II
Planet Earth II

   2016    Nature
Nova Wonders
Nova Wonders

   2018    Science
The Normans
The Normans

   2010    History
The Story of India
The Story of India

   2007    History
The Making of the Mob
The Making of the Mob

   2016    History