Documentarymania

Simply the Best Documentaries

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In the Shadow of Hitler
First Celts
King Arthur
Our Universe
R.E.M. by MTV
Ballet 422
Samurai Sword
The Lost Pyramids of Caral
Rescue
Is your Brain Male or Female
London: The Modern Babylon
Can Alzheimer Be Stopped
A.I. and the Destiny of Mankind
Dream and Machine
Plant Predators
The Great Math Mystery
When East Meets West
Meditation Can It Change You
Inside the Brain of a Trader
Neptune and Uranus
Parenthood
Planet Earth II Grasslands
Life of a Universe Creation
The Art of Germany: A Divided Land
History of the World: Survival
No Impact Man The Documentary
The Farthest
The Fantastic Mr Feynman
WWII In 3D
20,000 Days on Earth
Life: Primates
Honshu
Neanderthal 2
Space Station
Cave of Forgotten Dreams
Behind Closed Doors

Order by   Views  Year  New Added  Featured  Title

The Day Pictures Were Born
The Day Pictures Were Born    2006

Dr Nigel Spivey explores how art influences life by tracing the development of the image from cave paintings to our modern obsession with images. Dr. Spivey begins his investigation by travelling to the Cave of Altamira near the town of Santillana del Mar in Cantabria, Spain, where in 1879 a young girls exclamation of 'Papa, look, oxen!' to her father, local amateur archaeologist Marcelino Sanz de Sautuola, is explained to have meant that Maria had just become the first modern human to set eyes on the first gallery of prehistoric paintings ever to be discovered.

Category:Art  Duration:58:38   Series: How Art Made the World

More Human Than Human
More Human Than Human    2006

Embark on a thrilling journey through time and five continents to the heart of creativity. Fusing social history, politics, science, nature, archaeology and religion, this international landmark series unravels a universal mystery - why the world around us looks like it does. Modern-day mysteries are answered by journeying back to the beginning of civilisation via some of the most amazing man-made creations in the world. In the first episode, one image dominates our contemporary world above all others: the human body. How Art Made the World travels from the modern world of advertising to the temples of classical Greece and the tombs of ancient Egypt to solve the mystery of why humans surround themselves with images of the body that are so unrealistic.

Category:Art  Duration:   Series: How Art Made the World

The Farthest
The Farthest    2017

Is it humankind's greatest achievement? 12 billion miles away a tiny spaceship is leaving our Solar System and entering the void of deep space. It is the first human-made object ever to do so. Slowly dying within its heart is a plutonium generator that will beat for perhaps another decade before the lights on Voyager finally go out. But this little craft will travel on for millions of years, carrying a Golden Record bearing recordings and images of life on Earth. In all likelihood Voyager will outlive humanity and all our creations. It could be the only thing to mark our existence. Perhaps some day an alien will find it and wonder. The story of Voyager is an epic of human achievement, personal drama and almost miraculous success. Launched 16 days apart in Autumn 1977, the twin Voyager space probes have defied all the odds, survived countless near misses and almost 40 years later continue to beam revolutionary information across unimaginable distances.

Category:Technology  Duration:1:36:40   

The Empire of Reason
The Empire of Reason    2017

Al-Khalili travels to northern Syria to discover how, a thousand years ago, the great astronomer and mathematician Al-Biruni estimated the size of the earth to within a few hundred miles of the correct figure. He discovers how medieval Islamic scholars helped turn the magical and occult practice of alchemy into modern chemistry. In Cairo, he tells the story of the extraordinary physicist Ibn al-Haytham, who helped establish the modern science of optics and proved one of the most fundamental principles in physics - that light travels in straight lines. Prof Al-Khalili argues that these scholars are among the first people to insist that all scientific theories are backed up by careful experimental observation, bringing a rigour to science that didn't really exist before.

Category:History  Duration:58:38   Series: Science and Islam

The Language of Science
The Language of Science    2017

Physicist Jim Al-Khalili travels through Syria, Iran, Tunisia and Spain to tell the story of the great leap in scientific knowledge that took place in the Islamic world between the 8th and 14th centuries. Its legacy is tangible, with terms like algebra, algorithm and alkali all being Arabic in origin and at the very heart of modern science - there would be no modern mathematics or physics without algebra, no computers without algorithms and no chemistry without alkalis. For Baghdad-born Al-Khalili, this is also a personal journey, and on his travels he uncovers a diverse and outward-looking culture, fascinated by learning and obsessed with science. From the great mathematician Al-Khwarizmi, who did much to establish the mathematical tradition we now know as algebra, to Ibn Sina, a pioneer of early medicine whose Canon of Medicine was still in use as recently as the 19th century, Al-Khalili pieces together a remarkable story of the often-overlooked achievements of the early medieval Islamic scientists.

Category:History  Duration:58:38   Series: Science and Islam

 
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